Do Any Women Work at the Dirty, Difficult and Dangerous Jobs that Men Do? Any Women At All?

August 22, 2018

Coal mining is a dirty, difficult and dangerous job. Miners are six times more likely to die from a work related injury than the national average

 

 

There seems to be some confusion as to what a “Dirty, Difficult and Dangerous job” is—obviously from people who don’t work at such jobs.

 

The DDD jobs require hard physical labor in an unpleasant, dangerous environment, like being suspended 1000s of feet in the air or stuck miles underground in an airless tunnel. The conditions are often torturous, like roasting heat or frigid cold. The job itself, the equipment and/or environment is so hazardous there are routine worker injuries or deaths.

 

The DDD jobs aren’t in offices, beauty salons, at the mall, restaurants, or other climate controlled environments where the most dangerous piece of equipment is the cash register.

 

Women are 52% of the population. If they were holding their own—like feminists claim they can—we would see equal numbers of men and women working at the DDD jobs. We don’t.

 

Discrimination based on gender is illegal in the U.S. If a woman applies to work as a logger or iron worker, and is even semi-qualified has a pulse, the company must hire her. Women aren’t working at the DDD jobs because they are being “discriminated against.”

 

Women don’t work at these jobs because they aren’t applying for them.  

 

I used U.S. Bureau of Labor Stats and Census 2010 stats to see the jobs women are working at, but it’s still hard to know exactly what women are doing.

 

When you take a closer look, you discover women aren’t doing the jobs they are counted as doing. Case in point: often when women work in a coal mine, they aren’t mining at the coal face. They operate the shuttle cars. Even counting these types of “coal miners,” women make up less than 1% of that work force.

 

99% of coal miners are men.*

 

When it came to garbage collection, it was hard to find out how many women picked up cans to empty them into the truck. It seems that women were driving the trucks, not physically picking up trash.  Even counting this, women make up less than 1% of total garbage collectors.

 

99% of garbage collectors are men.*

 

100% of deep sea fishermen are men.

 

100% of electrical power line installers are men.

 

100% of roughnecks (work the oil drill) are men.

 

99% of auto repair mechanics are men.*

 

99% of roofers are men.*

 

100% of heating, air conditioning and refrigeration mechanics are men.

 

98% of metal fabricators are men.

 

97% of aircraft maintenance and service technicians are men.

 

95.5% of firefighters are men

 

92% of construction workers are men.

 

88% of patrol officers are men.

 

Women are counted as highway maintenance workers, but they aren’t spreading sizzling hot asphalt, and digging ditches. They are holding up “Stop” and “Slow” signs. Females made up 2.5% of road crews.

 

In 2006, according to U.S. Bureau of Labor Stats, 5,396 men and 444 women were killed on the job.

 

Women were only 7.5% of on-the-job fatalities.

 

This proves that men are working at jobs which are far more dangerous than the jobs women work at.

 

The Most Dangerous Jobs in America:

  1. Fishing

  2. Logging

  3. Pilots / Flight Engineers

  4. Structural Iron and Steel Workers

  5. Farming / Ranching

  6. Garbage Collector

  7. Roofing

  8. Installers and Repairmen Working on Electrical Power Lines

  9. Truck Drivers

  10. Coal Mining

What do most of these jobs have in common? Women make up less than 1% of the workers.

 

And, btw, the 412 rescue workers who were killed in the 9/11 attacks were…all men. That’s because when you’re caught in raging flood waters,  or trapped on the side of a mountain, who is going to risk their life to rescue you? Men.

 

What is the point of this post? It’s so feminists can see in black and white that men—not women—are doing the unglamorous, hazardous jobs that are required to maintain our comfy way of life. It’s also to show that women do need men. Men aren’t just walking sperm banks we can do without.

 

If feminists want to talk about inequality, here it is.

 

*When it came to women being “less than 1%” of the total work force of a particular job, I rounded up in women’s favor. I gave women a full 1% to make it easier to read.

 

TAKE THE PHOTO CHALLENGE: To all of you who disagree, prove me wrong. Take photos of the work crews in these jobs. Show they are 50% women. I will post your photos right here.  Just say in comment section that you possess such a photo and I will email you my address. As of 7/2017 I have received no photos.

 

Also, don’t bother commenting how you, “know a woman who….changes her own tires or fixes her own toilet” or you know the ONE woman who works as a [fill in blank with DDD job]. This does not change the facts—that you know of the one exception.

 

UPDATE 11/2016: I get a lot of female commenters who claim women would do just fine if men were to suddenly disappear—because women can do “anything” a man can. Women would simply “take over.”

 

Today a FL nursing home called 911 because they desperately needed help with a…..squirrel loose in the rec area.  You ladies are so pathetic you can’t even shoo an animal out of a room—and call for a man to take care of it—but you’re perfectly capable of handling an electrical grid if it goes down.

 

Originally published, here.

 

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