Distinction between Strangulation, throttling, Mugging, Bansdola, and Garrotting under medical jurisprudence explained

Javed Abdul Rajjaq Shaikh Vs State of Maharashtra

Supreme Court

06/11/2019

(2019) 10 SCC 778; Criminal Appeal No. 1181 of 2011

About/from the judgment:

As to what is the distinction between strangulation and throttling is also dealt within the self-same work:

 

Definition-Strangulation is defined as the compression of the neck by a force other than hanging. Weight of the body has nothing to do with strangulation.

 

Ligature strangulation is a violent form of death, which results from constricting the neck by means of a ligature or by any other means without suspending the body.

 

When constriction is produced by the pressure of the fingers and palms upon the throat, it is called as throttling. When strangulation is brought about by compressing the throat with a foot, knee, bend of elbow, or some other solid substances, it is known as mugging (strangle hold).

 

A form of strangulation, known as Bansdola, is sometimes practised in northern India. In the form, a strong bamboo or lathi (wooden club) is placed across the throat and another across the back of the neck. These are strongly fastened t one end. A rope is passed round the other end, which is bound together, and the unfortunate victim is squeezed to death. The throat is also pressed by placing a lathi or bamboo across the front of the neck and standing with a foot on each of lathi or bamboo.

 

Garrotting is another method that was used by thugs around 1862 in India. A rope or a loincloth is suddenly thrown over the head and quickly tightened around neck. Due to sudden loss of consciousness, there is no struggle. The assailant is then able to tie the ligature.

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Knowledge and content of about almost all their respective descriptions are borrowed from law-related blogs and websites, we, therefore, wish to give proper credit to all the respective law-related blogs and websites like LiveLaw, Bar and Bench, LatestLaws, PathLegal, FirstLaw, Lawctopus, IndianKanoon, Manupatra, LegallyIndia etc.. Many of the judgments are also taken from them websites of Hon'ble Supreme Court and other respective Hon'ble High Courts!

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